Forum Posts

Heather hart
Jan 18, 2022
In General Discussion
Every New Year a big societal push comes "to get into shape". First off, let's talk about why this really is emphasized once a year in the public eye. Don't even get me started on how this creates unhealthy expectations for millions of women and men around the United States. So, I am here to combat what this can look like in a more realistic way that won't lead to burnout. Lets consider what we believe body movement is? Why is body movement important to you? What do your daily movements look like already? How could you steadily, slowly increase your body movement throughout your day? Maybe this looks like stretching at your desk, extending a daily walk by five minutes, dance, or three squats while you brush your teeth. Movement no matter how little can make big impacts on our body and mind. Let's set ourselves up for success in how we consider build body movement into our daily life by showing up with compassion. You wouldn't expect your friend who hasn't lifted weight in five years to join a gym and become a body builder in a month would you? So why would you push yourself past your realistic limits? Be gentle, be compassionate and you will succeed.
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Heather hart
Dec 20, 2021
In General Discussion
Oftentimes our balance between brain and body might not be where we want it to be. When we think of balance we might think of a seesaw or teeter-totter. With all of life's responsibilities on either side, work, school, kids, pets, and on the other side is the time we set aside for ourselves. Is it balanced? There is also this idea of balance in how we practice self care, we wander to all the physical things we should do for ourselves, exercise, eat better, get more sleep, etc. and when we think of brain balance what do we think of? Is it a mainstream topic of health and wellness? Not as much as it should be, There is an old saying "The root of all health is in the brain. The trunk of it is in emotion. The branches and leaves are the body. The flower of health blooms when all parts work together." This is the idea of creating balance through self-attunement. This means checking in with ourselves and assessing how we feel, what our need is, validating our need and pursuing whatever it is we need comfort, nurture, rest are some examples. When we attune to ourselves emotionally, research shows us the body calms down quicker. This is the same idea of the kid that falls down and will calm down quicker if a caregiver is there to comfort rather than having to self-soothe. So just like that kiddo, you will be able to manage situations in life better is you take the time to relax and spend time in a calmer body & brain. This might mean hug a loved one, take time to do "nothing". mentally shift from negative to positive thinking, exercise and eat a healthy meal once a day. these are some small simple steps you can take to balance your body and brain.
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Heather hart
Dec 20, 2021
In General Discussion
Before, During and After the Eating Experience: 1) Assess your breath: Invite in a deep inhale and longer exhale breath. Perhaps even try a form of mindful movement that fits your body’s needs¬. Yoga postures like Breath of Joy or a variation of Downward Facing Dog are good options. For many, these approaches bring about a calming effect to the nervous system. Calm(er) body and mind = More mindful choices 2) Get Curious/Not Furious: Are you hungry? What type of hunger is it? Physical? Emotional? How do you know? Where do you feel it? If you would like to explore hunger and fullness cues further, talk to your Registered Dietitian or consider exploring other reputable resources such as The Center for Mindful Eating. Try not to judge what you find. And try not to “judge the judging.” Remember, it is information. Do nothing or something with it. You have choices and options. 3) Address: Now that you have a sense of your hunger cues, move with intention. How will I feed myself based on my assessment? What do I need to support increased or sustained awareness (consider the previous posts in this series: grounding, centering, prayer, quote…) Also keep in mind, sometimes it can be really helpful to have a general plan of what you are going to eat ahead of time and know you can adjust this based on what you discover in your assessment. Especially when you are first starting this practice. In summary, Bring Awareness to the eating experience. To how you feel, what you feel, what you choose to do based upon that awareness. To what you are purchasing, preparing, plating, consuming and cleaning up. To begin, you may think of this as a 3 step formula or rhythm: a. Breath and Centering (see (1) above and previous posts) b. Attentive Awareness (Gentle curiosity to wandering thoughts; seeing, smelling, tasting your food; noticing hunger and fullness as appropriate to your process.) c. Breath and Centering These beginning steps could help rebuild the bridge between your body and mind when it comes to eating. Each time you practice, you learn. Each time you learn, you gain knowledge. Each time you gain knowledge, you have the opportunity to make informed choices. Try to keep in mind: “The Art of Being Mindful is Knowing When You Are Not”. This is the most important step in creating a mindful practice of any type, not only eating. When you notice the moments you are unaware, guess what? You are building awareness! Awareness is a crucial key in the positive change process. Be curious as to what door of potential it could open with in you. You are unlimited!
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Heather hart
Dec 20, 2021
In General Discussion
Fear network in the brain When you feel afraid, the five senses of seeing, hearing, tasting, smelling and touch translate information happening in our immediate environment. Research has identified the prefrontal and limbic areas in the brain that get triggered in a fear response. This is the space behind your forehead, this part of the brain regulates and categorizes all of our implicit and explicit input. There are a a few stages that go into a fear response. The threat detection, arousal, and regulated responses to stimuli through our nervous system. This means our brain registers the lion, determines whether or not the lion is going to eat us or mind it's own business and how freaked out our nervous system needs to be, do we freeze, flee or fight? How are fear and anxiety connected? While anxiety and fear feel similar, anxiety is a reaction to our emotions versus danger in the environment. Anxiety is a stop-reaction to the impulses that fear and other core emotions create inside the body. For example, fear mobilizes energy for movement and anxiety pushes it back down. Why would we learn to push down our fear (or other core emotions)? Here are some reasons: We were told or shown that we were bad or weak for being afraid. Our fear was unwanted or not permitted by others we needed. Our fear felt or feels overwhelming and unmanageable. We could not escape danger at one time. We have too many emotions at one time to process or understand them. Our fear conflicts with other emotions, beliefs, values and what others ask of us. What makes anxiety so confusing is that we can experience it due to something upsetting in the present and we can experience it from something in the past that continues to influences us. Psychotherapy can be helpful in determining what events from the past influence our anxiety in the present. How can we reduce fearful feelings? Core emotions like fear calm down when they are fully and safely experienced in the body — once we no longer feel threatened or in danger. Using deep belly breathing plus a mindful, curious and compassionate stance, we can follow the sensations of fear in the body, like trembling, until they release or dissipate.Anxiety, on the other hand, needs to be calmed not only to feel better, but to help get us in touch with the core emotions that underlie it. When working through anxiety, it can be helpful to first find a quiet place to slow down, feel our feet on the ground, and take six or big deep belly breathes. Not only does this set the stage for processing emotions, but it immediately begins to calm anxiety because we are calming our nervous system and bring our pre-frontal cortex back online. Then, we must get very curious about what core emotions we might also be experiencing. we might ask ourselves, “Is anything scary or dangerous happening to me right now?” If I am going too fast in my car or boarding an airplane, I might answer “yes” to this question. If the answer is “no,” I can discern that I’m experiencing anxiety. For example, Steve gets hit with a jolt of what feels like fear every time his boss assigns a task. We determined this was anxiety and not fear. Why? Because doing tasks are not dangerous to survival. However, as a little boy, when Steve made a mistake, he was chastised and humiliated. As an adult, Steve’s mind equates doing tasks with the memory of being shamed, which triggers anxiety. When working with anxiety, Kalm encourages you to go deeper to see if you can identify one or more core emotions that are underlying the anxiety. Ask yourself, “Do I feel angry? Do I feel sadness? Do I feel afraid? Do I feel disgusted? Do I feel excited? Do I feel joy? Do I feel sexually excited?” Emotional health is as important as physical health. They are connected, our emotional health directly impacts our physical health. When we feel anxious or scared, it’s time to understand what is happening so we can respond to our emotions in a way that nurtures both our short- and long-term emotional health.
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Heather hart
Dec 20, 2021
In General Discussion
The New Year is often full of building new habits and goal setting and then slowly it tapers off into our old routines. Except then we are filled with the shame of failure or we live in the ignorant bliss of avoidance until the following year. So what would it look like if we set ourselves up for success in the New Year instead of that familiar disappointment. What have you done in the past that hasn't worked? What have you done in the in the past years that has worked? Moving forward with intention is so important when setting up for measurable, attainable goals and building healthy habits! First thing to consider is the CUE, where is our reward for the task we are doing? Secondly, CRAVING, what feeling are you craving from the habit? Third, RESPONSE, what is your motivation to do this habit t succeed in this goal? Lastly, REWARD, what would it satisfy in you to complete this habit & goal? Having all of these questions answered beforehand can help set you up for success in the New Year, and might be a little different than what you've done in the past!
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Heather hart
Dec 14, 2021
In General Discussion
We want you do a body scan. Take a moment, close your eyes and take a few big deep breathes in, letting your belly fully expand and all the way out. Letting your body relax. Begin to check in with your body from your head, to shoulders, stomach, hands, legs to toes. Now, gently noticing what parts in your body experience tightness, tension, pain or upset feeling. As you notice these areas, we want you to imagine they have a shape, color, do they have a texture, do they make a noise? An example is a chest tightness that feels like an angry red rectangle, rough to the feel, making a loud humming noise. Just notice what shows up for you. Now imagine a color that represents healing? A color that is calm, serene, peace, that offers flow. Gently imagine that this color of healing is moving through your body and absorbing those areas of stress. absorbing, moving and dissipating. The more you use this color of healing the more you have available. Pretty soon you notice your whole body is filled with this healing color. You feel calm, peaceful and relaxed. End by giving yourself kindness and positive affirmation that you shifted your body and brain to a healthier moment of peace. Good job ___. I showed myself kindness today. I showed up myself in this moment. Use this anytime you feel anxiety beginning in the body. It is a good tool to have in your box of healing tools.
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Heather hart
Dec 07, 2021
In General Discussion
Holiday's can be difficult. There is so much pressure around holding holiday cheer, feeling "in the spirit" and being happy. But what happens when that isn't the case? Often people don't address the grief of less sunshine, anniversaries of loss, or overwhelming stress that can also pop up around holidays. So, when we are supposed to be feeling good and we feel bad how do we acknowledge, validate and move through things that feel sad, lonely and just outright difficult? Let us give you some thoughts on what works for us. AWKNOWLEDGE The life you thought you’d have while you’re slowly building the life you currently have The love you hoped for but are currently facing a different reality than expected The struggles you’ve been facing keeping up to par in university or at work The health you envisioned for your body, yet you are struggling with chronic pain The love you sought in your family but did not receive The parents you wished you’d had The holidays that bring up feelings of confusion, loss and isolation The loss of freedom that comes along with a new life stage The expectations you’ve had to release due to personal limitations The realization that your loved one might never fully understand a big part of you The awareness that your social group is shifting The loss of a leadership role at work or a big change in your job description The shifts in your financial earnings The loss of safety when you’ve been betrayed or hurt by someone you trusted The diminished confidence in yourself as you navigate a new, scary phase of life The changes in your relationship with G-d or your beliefs The ending of a relationship and the pains that come along with it The mental health challenges that run in the family and the pain it causes you The siblings you didn’t get to have, or the relationship you wish you had The brains you wish you had The creativity that just doesn’t flow naturally for you The concentration you have been having a hard time with lately The physical fitness level you have never been able to achieve The changes in your identity as you mature The loss of naivety as you are exposed to the harshness of the world The thick skin and aggression you’ve had to use in frightening situations The difficult associations you have with intimacy, sex and love The years you lost being disconnected from yourself and others The difficulties you have had in cultivating healthy relationships You have permission to grieve any other forms of losses as well. VALIDATE Grief, loss and hurts are painful. Scary. Confusing. Upsetting. And that’s why it's understandable that many people like to avoid feeling them. They might even shut down completely if they feel that their emotions might overwhelm their system. Ignoring the hurt just repositions the pain. It ends up popping up somewhere else, like a whack-a-mole game, making it worse in the long run. Many people even turn to drugs, alcohol or other addictions to try and numb the pain. Anger, irritability, depression, chronic body aches, neck pain, anxiety and other health problems serve the same biological purpose. We want to learn to feel, deal and heal, so we can move forward and through. By embracing the hurt and allowing the losses to exist, letting yourself experience the sadness, the pain, the flowing of tears, frustration and conflicted feelings, it might feel harder in the short term, but it is actually a healthier remedy that creates emotional space for longer term healthy living. MOVING THROUGH As you attempt these shifts, remember that it’s OK and expected to backslide or feel depleted of energy as you face this new lifestyle that feels so foreign. Always remember that tomorrow is a new day. Eventually your new outlook and routine will click and become a part of you. Although it’s daunting to accept this forever task of learning to live with grief, eventually you won’t have to try as hard to show up for yourself and others. Eventually you will find a new unique and special way to create a space of honor for your loved one in this new life and you will feel a wave of warmth when you think of them, rather than get knocked down by the high tides (unless there is some unprocessed tension you have with the one you lost. In that case, you might consider some therapy to help alleviate that burden so you can shift without carrying the extra weight of this burden around with you). Resisting the negative emotions, thoughts or feelings will only exacerbate them. So the more we can do to accept our experience will help us move through them quicker. So, let Kalm provide you with some daily support because we know holiday stress is REAL.
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Heather hart
Dec 03, 2021
In General Discussion
Wellness. This is a term that is thrown around a lot. But does anyone ever break it down? When we are saying “wellness” what is it we are actually saying, talking about or measuring? How do we know if we are a well person? At Kalm we like to make things simple and digestable so that it feels more applicable to daily life. Our hope is that you take some of these concepts and bring them back to your daily living to add support in building a healthier brain and body. FOOD Food is one of those things that our culture dominates in. Whatever your focus is you can find information on it with a tap of your finger. But when we begin to think about our relationship with food what comes up? Often our ideas of what food is, how we interact with food and what we are seeking from food can be a bit more complicated. It becomes even more messy when we think about wellness and food. Ultimately, wellness with food is different for each person depending on history, goals and experience. What research says is when we are able to make neutral (not stress based), conscious decisions around food that are based in balance we are on our way to a healthier brain and body. MOVEMENT Movement is another hard culturally pressed point of wellness. Right? If I had a dollar everytime I saw a fitness model campaigning for what “wellness” should look like. This is complete bullshit. Movement shouldn’t be defined by how many yoga sessions we’ve done or if we have completed our cardio for the day. Movement in a healthier more balanced lens can be defined as any type of body movement. Once more we come back to this concept of balance. If we have had a ten hour work day maybe adding an additional hour of working out wouldn’t be helpful to our brain. So instead of speeding up, we slow down, maybe this means resting, stretching or breathing. Finding that balance is crucial in receiving the benefits from the act of movement itself. SLEEP Sleep is something that we often feel we don’t have any control in. But what research says is we can set ourselves up for a healthier sleep. Sometimes it can begin with tracking what your sleep habits are, how restorative your sleep is, and your sleep history. Just like anything else when we begin to show attention to a certain life area we can begin to shift how we enter this activity. Sleep has a really big into impact on brain and body health and often can be one of the most underdiagnosed areas in our life. So our encouragement is to begin to pay attention to what sleep is like for you. ENVIRONMENT Environment has a huge impact on healthy brain, healthy body. Having a clean, safe, calm environment makes a difference even in how our nervous system regulates on a daily basis. It can also add stress into our daily life. Whether we’re thinking of our home, work or social environments, all of these different environments impact our well-being. Some things to think about in regards to environment might be, do I feel safe in this space, do I feel organized, do I feel calm? If we walk into our room and it’s covered in laundry piles which gives us a stress response, we need to consider how this might impact our overall health! COMMUNITY Friends, family, work, hobbies, all can be apart of our community and how we receive support, validation and encouragment. There is much research on why it is not healthy for our body or brain to do life isolated. One of the biggest studies done was on what happens in the brain when someone experiences severe isolation. The study was done on people who experience solitary confinement. what they found is that they are more likely to develop anxiety, depression, suicidal ideation and psychosis. Isolation also affects physical health, increasing a person's risk for a range of conditions, including memory impairment, vision loss, and chronic pain. Now when we take this concept and generalize it to everyone’s daily living it tells us that in order to live healthy, whole lives we need people, interaction with others and community. Our brains are not built to live life by ourselves, even for a short amount of time. CALM Calm is hard to find in our modern world. Daily living is filled with the busy rush of living. Sometimes finding or even choosing a few moments of calm can be difficult. My question to you is why aren’t you choosing calm in your daily life? What is the barrier? If you already are choosing calm then I am curious to know how does this calm impact you? What would you hope happens if you do build or deepen calm into your life? CONNECTION TO EARTH Connection to earth is that thing that we don’t prioritize because we believe it’s harder to do, or harder to find. But the truth is, earth is all around us. Research says that when we ground to the earth whether it’s being barefoot in the grass or laying our hand on a tree our body absorbs the electrons from nature. When are body absorbs these electrons it can improve sleep, lower blood pressure, increase thought clarity, improve mood and so much more. There’s so many health benefits to connecting to the earth. So, if you were to be connected to dirt, sun, water, plants what would you want this to look like We hope you take some of these concepts and contemplate how to integrate them into your daily living. What is missing, what might be helpful, what do you already do? The key to success with anything is balance. Are these seven areas balanced in your daily living? If not, how can we support you in building balance?
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Heather hart
Nov 17, 2021
In General Discussion
Starting with self-compassion is a good place to begin. If we step back and think about what researchers call “common humanity,” we realize that we aren’t alone with our anxiety. Right now, there are thousands and thousands of people who share our worries and experiences in anxiety. And there are things we can do in the middle of the night to illuminate our worry when we feel overwhelmed by daily stress. Practices with light are found in almost every spiritual tradition. The following is a simple meditation that can comfort you whenever you need to help bring “light” to difficult situations or feelings. It is also a peaceful way to end the day and calm our body before we go to sleep. It can be done when your brain won't shut off, when we have that same worry loop happening or our body feels restless. 1. Imagine that you are sitting and watching a beautiful sunrise with a wide spectrum of soft, luminous colors. As the sun rises over the horizon, feel it gently warming and illuminating your body: at first the face and eyes, then the neck, chest, arms, torso, pelvis, legs and feet. 2. If it feels comfortable, allow the soft light to enter your body, filling it with a golden glow. Feel the light touching the dark or arid places within yourself. Let it radiate to any place where you hold pain or worry. 3. Let the light fill your entire body, touching your bones, your muscles, your internal organs, veins, arteries. Imagine your entire being sparkling and radiating light. See if your body can relax or soften, releasing any place where you might be clenching or holding tension—your fists, your stomach, your jaw. 4. Rest in this light for few moments. If you like, let yourself become, as the Buddha said, “a lamp unto yourself.” 5. Imagine that you can allow this radiance to spread to those in your family, your friends and loved ones, to those in your neighborhood, your community, your state or country, and finally throughout the world. When you are done, look around. Some people feel that things around them look just a little bit brighter, and they often feel a little lighter as well. Kalm body, Kalm mind. Choose Kalm. How did this work for you? What was helpful, what was not? What was it like to feel calmer?
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Heather hart
Nov 11, 2021
In General Discussion
What does it mean to us to not have it all together? This is a scary concept, one that we don't frequently talk about with our community. We live in a culture that preserves perfection. So often we derive our worth from productivity and high levels of engagement. This gives us belonging, purpose and intention for how and why we engage in our community. But what happens when this fails? When we can't keep up, reach out, complete a task? Shame. Shame is such a complex emotion and often overwhelming. It is something that we sit in alone and don't share with others. It fuels anxiety, worry, stress, depression, fatigue, frustration, and more. Research shows us that we need a feeling of shared experience for creating a sense of connection and health. In a study by Stanford Medicine, it was demonstrated that that lack of social connection has more detriment to a human that obesity, smoking and high blood pressure. Furthermore, that social connection leads to a 50% increased chance of longevity, better immune function and overall life satisfaction. Kalm is about sharing who we are. Kalm was created to give a sense of internal strength and independence in one's own ability to regulate emotionally during those day to day stress filled moments. Remembering and reminding that you are not alone. You are not the only one who feels this way and that you have a community support at anytime. What research shows us is that with compassionate support healing can happen in our brain and body. This kind of care demonstrates to those parts of us who hide, hold anxiety, worry, stress and feel like they don't have it all together that they are accepted and cared for. So, how do you hold compassion for yourself when having a bad day? What are the things that could be comforting to you when you are not feeling good, put together or perfect? If you can't think of anything for you, I wonder what you might tell a friend who is having a bad day?
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Heather hart
Nov 11, 2021
In General Discussion
There are all different types of mindfulness. Often our exposure to mindfulness techniques are pretty limited. Kalm wants to take some time to educate you on all the different types that way you can try different mindfulness techniques and see what works for you. Our hope is that this empowers and inspires you to create some of your own daily mindfulness practice. Focused attention. This form of meditation focuses on our breath to focus attention, to anchor the mind and maintain awareness. Notice your mind starting to wander? Simply return to the breath. Where is breathe in your body? How does it move? Body scan. Often, our body is doing one thing while our mind is elsewhere. This technique is designed to sync body and mind by performing a mental scan, from the top of the head to the end of your toes. Imagine a photocopier light slowly moving over your body, bringing attention to any discomfort, sensations, tensions, or aches that exist. Simply bring breathe into those areas with gentle compassion. Noting. Whatever you may be doing, noting is just that, noticing what is happening in your body and brain without judgement. We “note” the thought or feeling to restore awareness, create a bit of space, as a way of letting go, and to learn more about our thought patterns, tendencies, and conditioning. Visualization. This type of meditation invites you to picture someone, real or imaginary, an object, animal or place in your mind. An example might be imagining your childhood pet to bring comfort to you. By creating a specific visualization, we get to observe our body and mind. Loving kindness. Focusing on the image of different people, it can be anyone in your life or you know. We direct positive energy and goodwill first to ourselves, and then, as a ripple effect, to others, which helps us let go of unhappy feelings we may be experiencing. Skillful compassion. Similar to the loving kindness meditation technique, this one involves focusing on a person you know or love and paying attention to the sensations arising from the heart. By opening our hearts and minds for the benefit of other people, we have the opportunity to creating a feeling of happiness in our own mind. Resting awareness. Rather than focusing on the breath or a visualization, this technique involves letting the mind truly rest; thoughts may enter, but instead of distracting you and pulling you away from the present moment, they simply drift away. Maybe they float away on a cloud, by stream or flower petals you blow away. Reflection. This technique invites you to ask yourself a question: perhaps something such as, “What are you most grateful for?” Be aware of the feelings, not the thoughts, that arise when you focus on the question. Kalm encourages you to try each one of these at a slow pace. There is no need to rush. Each one of these techniques serve a different purpose in mind and body. See what works for you. Feel free to reach out with any questions, worries or concerns. We are here to support.
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Heather hart
Nov 11, 2021
In General Discussion
Oftentimes we begin a habit and then after a few weeks we might begin to forget to use it. This is okay, it's actually apart of the process of building a healthy habit. Rewiring our brain is not an easy process. If we think of it like building a road. You think of all the time, effort, people and material it takes to build a road. A big work crew, months sometimes even years, concrete, sand, tar, it is so much! Our brain is no different. we sometimes need a day off, need additional help, encouragement, or even more material. This is normal. So take that break if feeling overwhelmed and come back to it when you are feeling less fatigued, busy, or whatever it is you are feeling. We will be here, for you when you need us. This is not a matter of failure or success. When you are ready we believe you will pick it back up.
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Heather hart
Nov 11, 2021
In General Discussion
Have you ever tried to do something new without a teacher, example or help? How did that go? If it didn't go well or maybe you struggled through it this would be a natural response. I think of the time I tried teaching myself how to knit from a book, it didn't go well. But when I was able to sit next to someone and practice, watch what they did and ask questions it went much easier! Why? because I wasn't doing it alone, I had support and comfort when I got things wrong. Someone to say, "you're doing okay, try once more." This idea can be true of our life experiences and specifically managing stress, anxiety or any type of daily hardship. Sometimes we feel like we have to be in it by ourselves. "People wouldn't understand." "I'm embarrassed." "I can't ask for help." These thoughts are not true here, in this space. Kalm community can be in that daily stress with you, we can handle it and there is nothing to be embarrassed about here in the present moment. We want to hear you, support you and have you succeed in using your daily tools and skills. We are here to be with you in growing healthy brain habits and calm body habits. we want you to feel safe, empowered and able to do what you put your mind to. This means some days are going to suck, be hard and you'll want to give up or simply forget. THAT IS OKAY, WE WELCOME ALL OF IT! And, we want to remind you in those moments, "you're doing okay, try once more when your ready."
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Heather hart
Nov 11, 2021
In General Discussion
Stress in the body, this isn't something that is a new concept to any of us. Right? Everyone at some point experiences tight muscles, fatigue, or a shift in sleep. The most recent research shows us that "About 33 percent of people report feeling extreme stress. 77 percent of people experience stress that affects their physical health. 73 percent of people have stress that impacts their mental health. 48 percent of people have trouble sleeping because of stress." Often we seek activity to remove this from our body whether that be a massage, a walk, chamomile tea, this is a normal response for us to want to soothe stress in our body. But what happens when it begins manifesting in bigger ways? Some examples may be: Change in appetite Shift in mood Stomach disruption Headaches and Migraines Chronic joint pain This can be a hard pill to swallow for many of us. We tell ourselves, we just need to exercise more, eat better, go to bed earlier, it is often about problem solving with external "fixes". Then once we have fixed the problem, it will go away and we will feel better. BUT what happens when we are doing those things and maybe that stress is still lingering? At some point maybe we realize doing more is not the answer, but actually doing less is. We can hold ourselves to such a high demand throughout our weeks and sometimes we forget to care for ourselves in that business. But eating is caring for ourselves! Yes, it is AND it is only caring for part of our need. A big part of our need is to create space for what our experience is. If we think of our nervous system as a highway, and that highway gets congested with an accident (stress) we would stop, slow down and let that get resolved before moving on, we might even offer help, or kind words, compassion to the people who experienced the fender bender. Our nervous system is no different. Sometimes our nervous system needs space, validation, compassion so it can calm down and begin moving in a healthy way once more. So, my questions to you are; How do you hold stress in your body ? What compassion, space and energy can we give to resetting our nervous system to create a calm body?.
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Heather hart
Nov 11, 2021
In General Discussion
Stress in the brain Is something that we all hold and is so normal! Did you know that intellectualizing information is often a way of disassociating from the discomfort in our body? AND better yet, we all do it, often it looks like problem solving, blanking out, or spending energy in an endless loop of worry and playing out future scenarios before they happen. We can do this for safety prediction, if we can give our brain an idea of what could happen we usually feel safer. BUT, we also know sometimes it doesn’t help and it becomes even more overwhelming. It can cause headaches, migraines, eye pain, neck pain, memory issues, stomach issues and much more. Research shows that when one part of our brain is engaged, other parts may not be available. For example, if we are in a dangerous situation our survival instincts take over and our brain goes offline, leaving us only having access to our lower limbic brain. This means we can’t make good decisions, use our good judgement or store things in our memory correctly. So, when we are in a hurry, late to a meeting, texting a friend and ordering coffee all at this same time our brain is not functioning effectively. Research also shows us that building distress tolerance can be done through calming our brain and body, so learning how to feel calm in higher levels of stress. Meaning practicing breath which calms our nervous system, in turn our brain and then our brain stays online in those same stressful situations. Which is why we ask that your use Kalm tools daily, having something familiar to distract, ground or create safety can influence the way in which we meet that stress with compassion. We want to know how you experience stress your brain? What would it be like to be able to magnage stress better, what that might mean or look like to you? What would you do with more brain power?
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Heather hart
Nov 11, 2021
In General Discussion
Look, we aren’t trying to fool anybody into thinking this Kalm journey is going to be a breeze. So many moments are going to feel like failure, overwhelm and frustration. We know this, AND we are still here with you regardless. We want to hear about those shitty and difficult moments. We want you to know that we care and we get it, we have had our fair share of hard moments too. Oftentimes when we try to shift our body experience or brain’s focus and can’t quite seem to be successful is a clue. A clue to pay even more attention to what is going on, but the trick is, we want you to pay attention with SELF-COMPASSION. If we haven’t been treated with compassion or empathy in our life experiences where we have struggled or had hardship it can be difficult to practice this. So, let us practice with you. When we are busy beating ourselves up using judgement and telling ourselves mean comments tell yourself this instead: I AM OKAY TO BE FEELING THIS WAY. IT WON’T LAST FOREVER. I AM DOING A GOOD JOB JUST TRYING. BUILDING A NEW BRAIN IS HARD WORK AND TAKES TIME AND I KNOW I WILL GET THERE. THIS MOMENT SUCKS, BUT I WILL BE OKAY BECAUSE I HAVE A PLAN FOR MY NEXT MOMENT. Giving the brain self-compassionate statements like these will seem silly at first, but the more we hear kindness in our moments of struggle, the more our brain practices integration. This statements will also help our brain practice self-organization which allows us to calm our body and brain In moments of stress. There is a saying said by the famous Daniel Siegel, “Where attention flows, the neural firing flows and neural connection grows”. Meaning, what we pay attention to will grow our brain in that way. So, if we want a calmer brain, calmer body, we don’t beat ourself up mentally or emotionally, but we have to accept it is hard, offer ourselves compassion and move forward with trying again. One last thing before I go: WE CAN DO THIS TOGETHER. KEEP TRYING.
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Heather hart
Nov 11, 2021
In General Discussion
What is mindfulness? Why is it important? What happens in the body and brain if we use mindfulness or if we don’t? Research tells us that mindfulness is an awareness brought to the body and brain through certain activities. Let’s use an example of a cup of water, if you add salt to a small cup of water it might be too salty to drink, but if you add that same amount of salt to a bigger cup of water then it might be tolerable. This concept applies to our stress and conscious awareness. If you increase the brain and bodies ability to hold stress in a useful, healthy way then stress won’t have such a negative impact on emotional health, physical health and mental health. What research has shown time and time again is that the brain is able to grow and change when reducing the stress load on the body and brain. This allows better immunity, cell regeneration, reduces inflammation, improves cholesterol levels and heart function as will as bring balance to your brain. This is why mindfulness and stress management is so important, it literally can save us from chronic illness, chronic pain, depression, anxiety, and disease. So, is this worth 2 minutes a day? If not, why? What is your barrier to using Kalm tools and skills to reduce your daily stress? Kalm wants to be a part of your success in stress management, we want you to be the healthiest version of you. Even in your worst moments, we believe you are still on your way be learning, growing and shifting which takes time and practice. We are in those hard moments just as much as those moments where you feel successful.
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Heather hart
Nov 11, 2021
In General Discussion
Stress is something that we often ignore in our daily life. Stress is also something that shows up in a variety of ways. What we do know and want to recognize is that stress can manifest mentally, emotionally and physically. Oftentimes when we begin experiencing high levels of worry, anxiety, sadness, frustration this can be a signal that our stress is becoming too much. Sometimes we can experience stress as change in appetite, headaches, poor sleeping, stomach issues, autoimmune issue and chronic pain. We know that stress negatively impacts us in a variety of ways. But how we acknowledge stress is only really recognized in a few ways. How we manage stress is often dependent on a need for time and done through appointments. Massage, acupuncture, yoga class, hiking, biking, etc. Or, there is always the avoidance of our stress which looks like mindless scrolling on our phone, binge watching TV, or giving a nod to our less pretty forms of coping like constantly needing a drink. Acknowledging how we hold our stress in our brains and bodies can be the first step to shifting our stress levels and how we manage our stress in daily life. SO often we feel out of control, or like we can't face our stress so we avoid it. But what Kalm knows is that we have to feel it to heal it. So with this, we our curious to know more about your experience with Kalm. How does stress show up in our thoughts and ability to cope emotionally? Most importantly, what happens if we are not addressing our stress and letting it build up? What happens in our body or brain when we use our Kalm tools and skills?
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Heather hart
Nov 11, 2021
In General Discussion
Building a habit often is something that doesn't happen on a conscious level. Research has shown that 43% of everyday actions are enacted habitually while people are thinking about something else. Research also shows that habit formation is only successful when we bring the intention of self- control to our present awareness. This means using our self-control to practice a habit daily. Meaning, we have to make a new habit accessible for daily use. Research shows us the biggest gap in implementing habits is time. We live in a busy, stressful culture with short attention spans and we are often searching for the next best thing. This is why we created Kalm to always be with you, not requiring much time but much intention. Neuroscience research tells us that it can take up to 90 days to build a habit that is enacted habitually. In translation, if you practice calming your nervous system and brain daily, eventually you will be calmer without having to actively think to about. Our hope at Kalm is to slow down, create intention and support for your to be successful in building healthy new habits.
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Heather hart
Sep 26, 2021
In General Discussion
You have purchased a Kalm box! Thank you. Now that you have purchased our box you have access to the Kalm community, a place to share your experience of Kalm. Research shows that having healthy community for support will encourage us to utilize our tools consistently because of a level of accountability that happens when other people witness your experience. You can share stories, GIFS, hashtags, experiences, hopes, wishes, etc. Our only ask is that your sharing is appropriate for others. Content can be triggering to others and we don't know what will trigger others, so we want to be careful, considerate and kind.
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Heather hart

Admin
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